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Little Africa and On The Green Line gather community’s insights

green line re-cap pic

 

Monday January 11th Little Africa and the On the Green Line Marketing Collaborative hosted a community listening and outreach session at Sabrina’s Café in St. Paul. The purpose of the session was to collect information on how residents, business owners, and other key community stakeholders use the On The Green Line Marketing resources.

Since the launch of the Green Line, the collaborative has organized a number of initiatives to provide marketing resources (directories, websites, bus-stop ads, etc) for local businesses and residents. The collaborative teamed up with the Midway Chamber of Commerce to explore ways to improve those efforts by organizing a series of community outreach sessions. The outreach sessions are taking place during the month of January at different St. Paul and Minneapolis locations along or near the Green Line.

In addition to residents and community members, Little Africa’s outreach session drew folks from the Minnesota Department of Transportation, Metro Transit, and State Senator Foung Hawj.

Sabrina’s Café owner Karima Omer, who recently re-opened her quaint coffee shop after being closed for nearly a month for re-modeling, provided participants with food and traditional Ethiopian coffee throughout the meeting. During the outreach sessions participants discussed current neighborhood and district brand presences, identified other community partners and collaborative efforts, and brainstormed potential marketing strategies that could benefit the community.

Things like re-launching a coupon book with deals from local businesses and creating an app to help people better locate small businesses and community happenings along the green line were some of many suggestions made.

“Making it easier to find things to do is a great idea.” Said Fatima Omar, who works as College Navigator for the International Institute of Minnesota, a St.Paul based non-profit.

“I really enjoyed the discussion. I’m glad I found out about this!” Omar said she saw the event posted on Facebook and was curious to learn more.

The information gathered during the outreach sessions will be complied by the On the Green Line Collaborative.To participate in this initiative, take the below survey or attend an upcoming On the Green Line outreach session:

 

  • Downtown Minneapolis
    Tues, Jan 19, 12pm-1pm
    The Open Book
    1011 S Washington Ave
    Minneapolis, MN 55415

 

  • Historic Rondo
    Weds Jan 20, 12pm-1pm
    Kings Crossing
    500 Dale St N
    St Paul, MN 55103

 

  • Stadium Village
    Weds Jan 20, 2:30pm-3:30pm
    Bar Luchador
    825 SE Washington Ave
    Minneapolis, MN 55414

 

  • Lowertown
    Thurs Jan 21, 12pm-1pm
    Black Dog Cafe
    308 E. Prince StSt Paul, MN 55101

 

  • Frogtown & Little Mekong
    Tues Jan 26, 6:30pm-8pm
    St. Paul City School – 643 Virginia St
    St Paul, MN 55103
    (part of Frogtown Neighbohood Mtg)

 

Do you use the Green Line for work or play? We’re also conducting a survey of rider habits and district marketing preferences. Take the survey and you’ll be eligible to win one of ten gift certificates to a Green Line restaurant! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/339KM9L

The survey will close Friday January 29th, 2016 at 5:00pm.

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African Economic Development Solutions, Finalist for 2016 Knight Cities Challenge

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In her now famous TED Talk “The Danger of a Single Story” acclaimed author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie said “…when we reject the single story, when we realize that there is never a single story about any place, we regain a kind of paradise.”

African Economic Development Solutions (AEDS) plans to do just that.

Tuesday, January 12 the Knight Foundation announced that AEDS’ proposed project “More Than a Single Continent: an intellectual tour of Little Africa through food, music, and discussion.” is a finalist for the Knight Cities Challenge. Of the 158 finalists chosen out of 4,500 applications from 26 different cities across the nation, AEDS is one of 10 finalist based in St. Paul.

The second year of a three-year run, the Knight Cities Challenge will select winners from among the finalist which comprise of nonprofits, government organizations, design experts and urban planning groups. The Knight Foundation will distribute 5 million dollars to the winning projects that best answer ways to make their cities successful. Winners will be announced by the foundation in the Spring of 2016.

AEDS’ proposed project “More Than a Single Continent” seeks to showcase the diversity of local African communities by hosting a series of events and discussions centered on food and music as the entry point to facilitate meaningful community dialogue, to educate, and to provide multidimensional visibility for the many African immigrant communities that call St. Paul home.

The ultimate goal of this project will be to mainstream a more inclusive and complex narrative of what it means to be African, but also to broaden what it means to be a resident of St. Paul. Through these discussions and events AEDS hopes to bridge the gaps that disengage folks, to establish a space where diverse peoples, especially communities of color, see themselves as a vital part of St. Paul’s long-term fabric.

This is the second time AEDS has been a finalist for a Knight Foundation award. In 2015 AEDS was a finalist for the Knight Green Line Challenge award which AEDS eventually won for a separate Little Africa project. Little Africa, a virtual and place based branding effort launched by AEDS in 2013, is rooted in St. Paul’s historic Hamline Midway area.

Since its launch, Little Africa has partnered with numerous community organizations to collaborate on dynamic community centered projects and events. One of the most visually recognizable of those collaborations can be viewed along Snelling Avenue where several murals decorate small businesses, thanks to a collaboration with Midway Murals.

Through Little Africa, AEDS hopes to implement creative placemaking strategies to foster meaningful community engagement, to inspire and create a space where St. Paul’s diverse populations of African heritage communities can thrive.

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AEDS awarded $60,000 for Little Africa Cultural Corridor

Wednesday, September 30, African Economic Development Solutions (AEDS) was announced as one of twelve winners of the Knight Green Line Challenge, a contest designed to revitalize neighborhoods surrounding St. Paul’s Light Rail. Administered by the St. Paul Foundation, this is the second year of the challenge, which launched in 2014.IMG_1760 (2)

With goals to expand economic opportunity, dismantle divides, and to foster civic engagement within the community, the Knight Green Line Challenge was open for any individual, business, or nonprofit to apply. The grant was more competitive this year, the Knight Green Line Challenge received over 300 applicants and awarded 12 winners a share in $574,000 of grant funds. Last year, 16 winners of the challenge shared only $530,000.

AEDS was awarded $60,000 for its Little Africa Cultural Corridor project. The project is designed to better market and support local African owned businesses and entrepreneurs. The idea is to bolster Little Africa’s position as one of the Twin Cities vibrant and distinctive cultural districts. AEDS will partner with the Saint Paul Riverfront Corporation to complete the Little Africa project.

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“I am very thrilled to see and witness that they (AEDS) were one of the award winners” Said Dr. Abraham Dalu, the Operations Manager of A&A Reliable Home Health Care.

An avid supporter of the Little Africa Cultural Corridor project and a recipient of the marketing and business development services AEDS provides, Dr. Dalu was one of many attendees of a banquet hosted by the Knight Green Line Challenge Wednesday evening to honor the 12 winning applicants at the Minnesota Museum of American Art in St. Paul.

“With Little Africa, the concept is to bring people together so that they can share a common future.” Said Dr. Dalu.

During the ceremony members of the Knight Green Line Challenge presented each of the 12 winners with custom coffee mugs inscribed with the titles of their innovative projects. The winners each had an opportunity to share their innovated project ideas with the audience and gave impassioned speeches about the goals of their projects.

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“We’re humbled to receive the award” Said Gene Gelgelu, Executive Director of AEDS.

Representatives of each winning project brought staff and loved ones to celebrate the night. Over all the ceremony was fun-loving and joyous. Towards the end of the ceremony, attendees mingled and conversed with one another. The atmosphere of the night was electric with promise and a shared ambition to bring life back into the diverse neighborhoods along the St. Paul Green Line.

Special Thanks to LISC, The Minneapolis Foundation, the Nexus Community Partners, The Knight Green Line Challenge, and many others for their continuous support of AEDS and our Little Africa project.

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Thank You to Our 2015 Little Africa Fest Sponsors

AEDS and the Little Africa Business and Cultural District of Minnesota would like to thank the Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), U.S Bank, NEXUS Community Partners, and all the local business owners that helped make Little Africa’s contribution to the 2015 Midway Arts Festival happen. Special thanks to the talented artist, musicians, dancers, the AEDS volunteers,our co-sponsors Midway Mural, and the numerous community members who made the festival a success.

midway mural

Mural painted along the Pizza Market Shop building for festival

Little Africa artists, performers , and volunteers.

Little Africa artists, performers , and volunteers.

littleafrica2015festsponsors

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There’s a New Cultural Business District in Town, And It’s Using Art to Change the Economic Landscape of the Twin Cities

littleafricaheader

Little Africa Promotes Sustainable Economic Growth

Scooch over Midtown, the Twin Cities have a new cultural business district in town and it’s called Little Africa. Last August, over 500 people attended the Midway Art Festival in St. Paul’s Hamline-Midway area, a cultural business district known as Little Africa. A reflection of the community’s boom in African owned businesses, the Little Africa Business and Cultural District of Minnesota co-hosted the Midway Art Festival with Midway Murals.

Funded in part with support the African Economic Development Solutions (AEDS) received from the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), U.S Bank, NEXUS Community Partners, and local business owners, the festival took place on Saturday, August 29th at Hamline Park and included a diverse array of interactive art and poetry activities for families to participate in.

Throughout the festival, a showcase of cultural drumming, singing, and dancing from a number of local artists of diverse African immigrant communities sustained the celebratory energy of the event. One performance by African cultural dancer Indy Jay, even went viral on Facebook. The video had over 15,000 views in just three days.

A highlight of the festival was the culturally inspired murals painted along the exterior of Piazza Market Shop, the African Plaza, and Snelling Cafe. Each mural “station” had food representative of the individual business owner’s African heritage; the food was free of cost to festival goers.

“Our desire is to use art and culture as a catalyst for economic development within the community,” said Gene Gelgelu, Executive Director of AEDS, and one of the main organizers of the Midway Art Festival. Gelgelu stressed the importance of including emerging artist to participate in the creation of the murals, two of which were African artists who AEDS created paid apprenticeships for with Midway Murals.

With between 50 to 60 African owned businesses in the Hamline-Midway neighborhood, Little Africa offers the promise of revitalization and economic gain, in a community struggling to rebrand itself as more than the neighborhood you pass on your way to the State Fair.

“We want to create a sustainable impact in the community,” said Gelgelu. He went on to explain why the role of AEDS in co-hosting the Midway Art Festival was critical. Gelgelu believes in the potential for Little Africa to create sustained job growth in the community and in the prospect of attracting tourism, thus furthering the economic growth of the area.

Overall, the festival was a lively display of cultural exchange. Residents of the Hamline-Midway neighborhood brought their families to partake in the festivities. Community leaders further energized attendees with impassioned speeches. Everyone came together to celebrate their shared love of the arts and of the diverse African cultures represented, cementing the neighborhood’s rightful status as one of the Twin Cities cultural business districts.
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2014 Little Africa of Minnesota Fest

Little Africa is a branding and marketing campaign focusing on African immigrant economic assets in three nodal points around primary transit corridors – the Blue Line, Green Line and Bottineau Corridor. Little Africa is an initiative of African Economic Development Solutions (AEDS) in partnership with the Little Africa Development Group. The mission of Little Africa is to leverage the rich and diverse business, arts and cultural assets of Minnesota’s growing African immigrant populations to build sustainable wealth within these communities.

Major sponsors of the Little Africa Fest were LISC, Central Corridor Funder’s Collaborative, AEDS and Concordia University. Supporters included the City of Saint Paul, Park and Recs, Hamline Midway Coalition, Mosaic, Friends of Hamline Park, Nexus Community Partners, and Neighborhood Development Center.

More details of the 2014 Little Africa Fest can be found at http://aeds-mn.org/little-africa-fest-2014-draws-people-from-15-cities-and-32-zip-codes.

For more information contact Gene Gelgelu at 651.646.9411 or visit AEDS Little Africa of Minnesota section at http://aeds-mn.org/category/little-africa-of-minnesota.

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Little Africa Book Club: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Join us for a discussion of Americanah  by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on Wednesday September 24, 2014 from 6:30 to 8 pm at Snelling Cafe.

Hosted by Dr. Debra Beilke of Concordia University St. Paul, Minnesota and Mr. Hassan Hussein, Poet and Executive Director, Oromo Community of Minnesota, Wednesday September 24, 2014 from 6:30 to 8 pm at Snelling Cafe. Please RSVP by emailing Gene Gelgelu, Executive Director of African Economic Development Solutions (AEDS) at ggelgelu@aeds-mn.org. Copies of Americanah will be available at the Little Africa Free Library at Snelling Cafe.

Little Africa promotes African businesses and cultural assets. Snelling Cafe brings you authentic African food and entertainment and is located at 638 Snelling Ave N, St Paul, MN 55104.

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The New Green Line: An Arts and Culture Catalyst

The New Green Line: An Arts and Culture Catalyst

The opening of the Green Line light rail this summer will not only inaugurate a long-awaited transportation corridor for St. Paul and Minneapolis but also foster cultural hotspots along the corridor showcasing local diversity, bringing communities closer together and boosting economic opportunities.

The rail line’s 11-mile route along the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to downtown Minneapolis travels through some of the region’s most distinct cultural districts including:

1. Little Mekong, home to many Southeast Asian immigrants and businesses (Western Avenue Station).

2. Rondo, St. Paul’s traditional African-American hub (Victoria Street Station).

3. Little Africa, a growing cluster of immigrant businesses (Snelling Avenue Station).

4. The Creative Enterprise Zone, the new name for a longstanding community of artists and artisans (Raymond Avenue and Westgate stations).

5. Prospect Park, a neighborhood between St. Paul and the University’s Minneapolis campus that hosts many student, faculty and cultural institutions such as the Textile Center (Prospect Park Station).

6. The West Bank, another campus neighborhood known for its theater, live music, unique restaurants and large Somali population (West Bank Station).

“Each of these districts represents a part of the richness of the Twin Cities,” says Kathy Mouacheupao, Cultural Corridor Coordinator for the Local Initiative Support Corporation-Twin Cities (LISC). “We know that arts and culture connects people, so we want to maximize the opportunity of the light rail for strengthening culture in these neighborhoods in order to leverage economic development.”

That’s the mission of LISC’s Central Corridor as a Cultural Corridor (C4) Program: to help community groups conceive and carry out cultural projects highlighting their unique assets as well as creating locally owned businesses and job opportunities for neighborhood residents.

“There’s a tension around gentrification in the Central Corridor,” Mouacheupao explains. “We are interested in doing work with a community, not to a community. We believe in supporting the artistic identity of the people living there, not moving in a bunch of hipsters and moving everyone else out.”

Lisa Tabor, who founded Culture Brokers to promote cultural inclusivity and is involved with the African-American Leadership Forum, says, “It’s an important and sophisticated way of thinking to invest in people at the same time you are investing in transit so residents don’t have to leave.”

The C4 program supports six community-led organizations along the Green Line with training, technical assistance and direct grants for planning and implementing programs as well as crafting a joint strategy to draw attention to the cultural assets found along the corridor as a whole.

Here’s what the C4-funded groups are working on:

Asian Economic Development Organization (AEDA): Little Mekong is already a center of Southeast Asian culture in St. Paul with restaurants, groceries, non-profit organizations and a large immigrant population. AEDA has big plans to add regular arts events, a traditional Asian Night Market, a public plaza, new housing, aesthetic and pedestrian improvements and a Pan Asian Cultural Center featuring a theater for the Mu Performing Arts company.

Rondo Arts and Culture Heritage Business District: The construction of I-94 ripped out the commercial center of Rondo, St. Paul’s African-American cultural hub, but it did not kill the community’s spirit. An inspiring initiative from the Aurora St. Anthony Neighborhood Business Corporation seeks to regenerate an economically vital business district that will showcase African- American culture for the entire region.

African Economic Development Solutions (AEDS-MN): African immigrants have opened 20 restaurants, shops and other businesses in the area around Snelling Avenue and University Avenue in St. Paul. C4 has given a planning grant to AEDS for cultural events to stimulate more businesses and customers. AEDS director Gene Gelgelu states, “Our interest is to revitalize the area with entrepreneurship and economic development. Everyone will be able to taste and smell and see and hear and feel Africa.”

Creative Enterprise Zone: This district straddling University Avenue on the West edge of St. Paul is already thriving with artists, graphic designers, potters, architects, toymakers, costume designers, artisans and unique light industrial businesses such as Midwest Floating Island, which recycles used carpets into habitat for marine animals in ecological restoration projects as far away as New Zealand. St. Anthony Park Community Council launched the Creative Enterprise Zone Action Team to better connect artists and artisans with one another so they can discover opportunities for sharing space, trading ideas, pursuing opportunities together and generally looking out for one another as rents in the neighborhood likely rise.

Prospect Park 2020: This group’s ambitious plans to turn a straggling industrial district on the north side of Prospect Park Station into a pioneer of sustainable 21st Century living includes a strong emphasis on the arts, crafts and design.

West Bank Business Association: The West Bank’s business association is accentuating the West Bank’s image as an arts center through stronger marketing and adding more visual arts to its plentiful music and theater offerings.

“Our vision is that people all over the region will think of riding the Green Line for fun, stopping to see all that’s going on around these stations,” says C4′s Kathy Mouacheupao. Dining in Little Mekong, enjoying the lively street life and cafes of Rondo, shopping for gifts in Little Africa’s shops and artisans’ studios in the Creative Enterprise Zone, touring the Textile Center and Surly Brewing Company in Prospect Park, seeing a play or music show on the West Bank.

Jay Walljasper writes, speaks and consults about urban and community issues. His website is JayWalljasper.com. Original posting can be found here.

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Emerging Cultural Corridors Along the Green Line

Emerging Cultural Corridors Along the Green Line
by: Jay Walljasper
February 19, 2014


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This post is the first in an occasional series “Cultural Corridor”. In this series, we will highlight distinct cultural districts along the Green Line participating in the Central Corridor as a Cultural Corridor program.

The opening of the Green Line light rail will not only inaugurate a long-awaited Twin Cities transportation corridor but will also foster a cultural corridor that highlights local diversity, brings communities closer together, and boosts neighborhood economies.

The rail line’s 11-mile route along the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to downtown Minneapolis travels through some of the region’s most distinct cultural districts including:

  • Little Mekong, home to many Southeast Asian immigrants (Western Avenue Station)
  • Rondo, St. Paul’s historic African-American hub (Victoria Street Station)
  • Little Africa, a growing cluster of immigrant businesses (Snelling Avenue Station)
  • Creative Enterprise Zone, the new name for a longstanding community of artists and artisans (Raymond Avenue and Westgate Stations)
  • Prospect Park, a neighborhood bordering the University that hosts many student, faculty, and cultural institutions such as the Textile Center (Prospect Park Station)
  • West Bank, another campus neighborhood known for its theater, live music, unique restaurants, and large Somali population (West Bank Station)

“Each of these districts represents a part of the richness of the Twin Cities,” says Kathy Mouacheupao, Twin Cities LISC’s cultural corridor coordinator. “We know that arts and culture connect people, so we want to maximize the opportunities provided by the light rail to leverage culture in these neighborhoods and strengthen economic development. This effort isn’t just about what’s happening in each individual district. It’s about connecting and coordinating projects along the whole corridor.”

That’s actually the mission of the new Central Corridor as a Cultural Corridor (C4) program supported by LISC. “There’s tension around gentrification in the Central Corridor,” Mouacheupao explains. “We’re
interested in doing work with a community, not imposing work on a community. We believe in supporting the artistic identity of the people living there. We want to ensure that they can continue living there, enjoying the benefits of development.”

Lisa Tabor, who founded Culture Brokers to promote cultural inclusivity and who participates in the African-American Leadership Forum, says, “It’s an important and sophisticated way of thinking to invest in people at the same time you are investing in transit so residents don’t have to leave.”

With funding from the Central Corridor Funders’ Collaborative, the C4 program supports six community-led organizations along the Green Line with training, technical assistance, and direct grants. Those grants can support planning and implementing programs, as well as collaborative strategies to draw attention to the cultural assets found along the corridor as a whole.

One part of the project is forging a peer network in which each group can learn from the others. Jun-Li Wang, an artist organizer at Springboard for the Arts and an advisor to C4, says, “This puts people around a table that didn’t exist before. They’re sharing ideas, they’re learning from one another, they have a shared language. This is the basis for building a stronger community outside C4.”

C4 plans for the corridor

Little MeKong, St. Paul
The Asian Economic Development Association (AEDA) has big plans for Little Mekong–already a center of Southeast Asian culture with restaurants, groceries, non-profit organizations, and a large immigrant
population. AEDA wants to add a traditional Asian Night Market, arts events, a public plaza, new housing, aesthetic and pedestrian improvements, and a Pan Asian Cultural Center featuring a theater for the Mu Performing Arts company. “Because of C4, we’ll be able to implement arts activities like our Summer Arts Series, which will supplement and promote the business activities here,” says AEDA Director Va-Megn Thoj. “Our bottom line is making sure families here have the opportunity to start a business or have a living wage job.”

Rondo Arts and Culture Heritage Business District, St. Paul
The construction of I-94 ripped out the commercial center of Rondo, St. Paul’s African-American cultural hub, but it did not kill the community’s spirit. An inspiring initiative from the Aurora St. Anthony
Neighborhood Development Corporation seeks to regenerate an economically vital business district that will showcase African-American culture for the entire region.

Little Africa, St. Paul
African immigrants have already opened 20 restaurants, shops, and other businesses in the area around Snelling and University Avenues. C4 has given a planning grant to African Economic Development Solutions (AEDS-MN) to support cultural events that stimulate even more businesses and attract more customers. AEDS Director Gene Gelgelu states, “Our interest is to revitalize the area with entrepreneurship and economic development. Little Africa will become the place where you go for food, dance, and music. Everyone will be able to taste, smell, see, hear, and feel Africa.”

Creative Enterprise Zone, St. Paul
Straddling University Avenue, this district is already alive with artists, graphic designers, potters, architects, toymakers, costume designers, artisans, and unique light industrial businesses. One example is Midwest Floating Island, which recycles used carpets into habitat for marine animals in ecological restoration projects as far away as New Zealand.

But there is a fear that rising rents around light rail stations will drive these kinds of creative enterprises away. That’s why the St. Anthony Park Community Council launched the Creative Enterprise Zone Action Team. According to Executive Director Amy Sparks, the goal is to “strengthen these businesses so they can better withstand higher rents”. The team’s strategy is to better connect artists and artisans with one another so they can discover opportunities for sharing space, trading ideas, pursuing opportunities together, and generally looking out for one another. “Our mixers are like a cross between happy hour, show-and-tell, and a TED talk,” Sparks notes.

Prospect Park 2020, St. Paul
Strong community engagement led to this neighborhood’s 2020 vision for redeveloping the Prospect Park station area into an example of sustainable 21st century living with an emphasis on arts and culture. An important anchor institution is the existing Textile Center, which has plans to expand by creating a new arts center near the new light rail station. The 2020 plan is part of a larger redevelopment effort, the Prospect North Partnership, that aims to define a new “city” within a city by leveraging the neighborhood’s rich assets and the intellectual capital and creative energy of the nearby University of Minnesota.

West Bank, Minneapolis
The West Bank has always been a lively spot, starting with its origins as a Scandinavian entertainment district and later as the Haight-Ashbury of the Upper Midwest. Now it’s a place where people from all walks of life cross paths: students, African immigrants, theatergoers, music fans, and devotees of its unique shops and restaurants. The neighborhood business association is accentuating the West Bank’s image as an arts center through stronger marketing and adding more visual arts to its plentiful music and theater offerings.

“Our vision is that people all over the region will think of riding the Green Line for fun, stopping to see all that’s going on around these stations,” says Mouacheupao. “Dining in Little Mekong and enjoying their
dynamic street life, learning about the history of Rondo, shopping in Little Africa and in artisan studios in the Creative Enterprise Zone, touring the Textile Center and Surly Brewing Company in Prospect Park, and seeing a play or music show on the West Bank.”

Life along the Green Line will soon offer a colorful array of unique experiences that make the corridor a destination in itself–giving an economic boost to neighborhood businesses large and small.

Jay Walljasper writes, speaks and consults about urban and community issues. His website is: JayWalljasper.com


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UPCOMING EVENTS
Central Corridor/University Avenue Corridor Development Initiative (CDI) Workshops
Please join the Frogtown Neighborhood Association and the City of St. Paul for a series of workshops on the redevelopment of 253-255 University Ave and the Sherburne and Galtier area.
Wed, February 5 Workshop 1: Gathering Information
Wed, February 19 Workshop 2: Development Scenarios – The Block Exercise
Wed, March 5 Workshop 3: Developer Panel
Wed, March 19 Workshop 4: Framing the Recommendations
All workshops held from 6:30 – 8:30 pm at University Buffet (225 University Ave W, St. Paul)
Free; refreshments served
http://www.corridordevelopment.org

Medium Rare: Music for the Best Steak House
Local composer, pianist and Irrigate Artist Todd Harper presents an evening of dinner music with bassist Andrew Foreman
Wed, February 19
5:00 – 7:30 pm
The Best Steak House, 860 University Avenue West, St. Paul

Call for Speakers: Rail~Volution 2014 Minneapolis/Saint Paul
Deadline: February 27, 2014
http://www.railvolution.org/call-for-speakers/

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AEDS Little Africa of Minnesota Branding

The nodal points for Little Africa in all three areas are classified as “opportunity clusters” in racially concentrated areas of poverty (RCAP) in the metro area by the Metropolitan Council. In the Saint Paul and Minneapolis nodes they represent high access to jobs and services with low performing schools and poor social and environmental living conditions. The Brooklyn Boulevard area is characterized as having moderate access to jobs and services and moderate performing schools and environments. The aim of this project is to provide an avenue for African immigrants to work collaboratively to achieve a higher standard of living and business and economic development.

Little Africa Logo Concepts

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